A graphical tool for configuring Alesis V-Series MIDI controllers on Linux.

In my last post, I explained how I reverse-engineered the Alesis SysEx protocol and detailed my findings. Now, two months later, I’ve finally decided to implement a tool for configuring these controllers on Linux.

The entirety of this work was done over the past two days, so it likely contains some hidden bugs, but as far as I can tell it is entirely usable.

Unfortunately, this is my first attempt at writing any kind of GUI, so it’s not beautiful. But hey, it works.

You can find the project on GitHub. Contributions are welcome.

Reverse engineering the Alesis V-series SysEx protocol.

I recently got back into music production and decided to order myself a MIDI controller. I got a few recommendations for the the Alesis V25, so I went ahead and ordered it. However, I was less than pleased to find that its configuration software wouldn’t run on Linux, even under Wine. Of course, this prompted me to reverse engineer the protocol that lets the software talk to the keyboard.

Continue reading Reverse engineering the Alesis V-series SysEx protocol.

Generating spectrograms the hard way with numpy.

A spectrogram is a convenient visualization of the frequencies present in an audio clip. Generating one involves obtaining the frequency components of each window of the audio via a Discrete Fourier Transform (DFT) of its waveform. While tools are available to both generate spectrograms and compute DFTs, I thought it would be fun to implement both myself in my language of choice, Python.

In the following, I will discuss computing a DFT (the hard way), processing a WAV file, and rendering a spectrogram (all in Python). If you’re impatient and just want to see the code, you can find it on GitHub.

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Integrating GitLab and Google Calendar.

Zeall, like many other software startups, uses GitLab for version control and issue management. We also use the ever-popular Google Calendar to handle meetings, reminders, and deadlines. For several months, we’ve been looking for a way to automatically push GitLab issue deadlines into Google Calendar, and until now it seemed impossible. Only after a recent migration from our own private mailserver to G Suite did we find a solution — or rather, figure out how to feasibly build one.

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The fruits of some recent Arduino mischief.

I recently consulted on a project involving embedded devices. Like most early-stage embedded endeavors, it currently consists of an Arduino and a bunch of off-the-shelf peripherals. During the project, I developed two small libraries (unrelated to the main focus of the project) which I’m open-sourcing today.

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A simple recommender system in Python.

Inspired by this post I found about clustering analysis over a dataset of Scotch tasting notes, I decided to try my hand at writing a recommender that works with the same dataset. The dataset conveniently rates each whisky on a scale from 0 to 4 in each of 12 flavor categories.

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An easy way to visualize git activity

Today, I wrote gitply — a fairly simple Python script for visualizing the weekly activity of each contributor to a git repository.

It started out as a run-once script to get some statistics for one of my projects, but I ended up improving it incrementally until it turned into something friendly enough for other people to use.

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Adventures in image glitching

Databending is a type of glitch art wherein image files are intentionally corrupted in order to produce an aesthetic effect. Traditionally, these effects are produced by manually manipulating the compressed data in an image file. As a result, this is a trial-and-error process; often, edits will result in the file being completely corrupted and unopenable.

Someone recently asked me whether I knew why databending different types of image files produces different effects — and particularly, why PNG glitches are the most interesting. I didn’t know the answer, but the question inspired me to do a little research (mostly reading the Wikipedia articles about the compression techniques used in different image formats). I discovered that most compression techniques are not all that different. Most of them just employ some kind of run-length encoding or dictionary encoding, and then a prefix-free coding step. The subtle differences between the compression algorithms could not explain the wildly different effects we observed (except for in JPEGs, perhaps, since the compression is done in the frequency domain). However, PNG used a pre-filtering step which made it stand out.

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A fun experiment with Twilio

I first heard about Twilio a long, long time ago. As Google Voice faded out of relevance, it took the lead in the mobile-communication-as-a-service market. However, I had never had the chance (or inclination) to play around with its API until today.

About 12 hours after we landed back in the US from our holiday in Mexico, Lynsey departed once again — this time to the Plant and Animal Genome conference (PAG) in San Diego. She asked me to supply her with pictures of our cats for the duration of her trip. I told her I would send her a cat pic every hour, on the hour.

I didn’t realize what I had gotten myself into until I had already deposited $20 into a new Twilio account and spent 2 hours coding away… Though my goal was just to send some photos of cats, I had developed a pretty general application that lets you build a queue of MMSes to be disseminated at a constant rate.

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Time clocking at the command line

I often feel inclined to start new projects to avoid working on old ones. In a particularly ironic display of procrastination, I have written a productivity-oriented application in order to avoid actual productivity. The app is called InSTiL, and its goal is to make it easy to log how much time you spend working on various projects. The source is available on Github, and the Readme provides a succinct overview of InSTiL’s functionality.

https://github.com/le1ca/instil