Adding custom fields to packets in ndnSIM 2.3 without forking the entire repository.

The recommended way to build something on top of ndnSIM is to fork its scenario template repository and work inside there. You still need to download and compile the actual framework, however you will simply install it into /usr/local and link to it instead of actually working inside the main repository.

It turns out that this workflow actually makes certain tasks a lot more difficult. You might think a network simulator would make it easy to add new header fields to packets. Well, think again.

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Information-centric networking for laymen.

The design of the current Internet is based on the concept of connections between “hosts”, or individual computers. For example, when you visit a website, your computer (a host) always connects to a particular server (another host) and retrieves content through a session-oriented pipe. However, the amount of content hosted on the Internet and the number of connected devices are both growing. This is a crisis scenario for the current Internet architecture — it won’t scale.

Several proposals for Next-Generation Network (NGN) architectures have been proposed in recent years, aimed at better handling immense amounts of traffic and orders of magnitude more pairwise connections. Information-Centric Networking (ICN) is one NGN paradigm which eschews the concept of connections entirely, removing the host as the basic “unit” of the network and replacing it with content objects.

In other words, the defining feature of an ICN is that instead of asking the network to connect you to a particular server (where you may hope to find a content you desire), you instead ask the network for the content itself.

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Blue Coat’s position as a Certificate Authority, and what it means for you.

Recently, Blue Coat Systems has been approved as an intermediate certificate authority. If you aren’t versed in network security, this means nothing to you. However, be assured that it is a big deal.

Blue Coat is primarily known as  a vendor of application-layer (deep packet inspection) firewalls. In other words, they help people sniff your data — primarily in order to censor the Internet. Maybe your company’s firewall blocks access to YouTube and Facebook while you’re at work. That’s no big deal — Blue Coat delivers something a bit more sinister.

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Unnecessary mathematics: queuing delay for two types of network traffic

This morning I asked myself what I thought was an interesting question:

  • If there are two types of traffic in a network, where one is much less common than the other, will the two types experience different queuing delays?

If you have more common sense than me, you’ve already figured out that the answer is “No.” But it took me about an hour to figure this one out.

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